Tag Archive: virtual worlds


The goddess Arenjee clearly approves of my offerings, since she’s lavished me with love the past few weeks. On my regular ‘disappointment runs’, otherwise known as mount runs, I received divine bounty in the form of Ashes of Alar, Onyxian Drake, Vitreous Drake and Drake of the North Wind. This was all within a couple of weeks with Onyxia and Slabhide coughing up within minutes of each other last week. Some of these mounts I’ve farmed for years, so I’m surprised but grateful to the goddess for deciding she likes me – at least for now, but we know how fickle she is.

However, the shine is taken off my dizzy fervor slightly with the uncertainty still hanging over the fate of flying mounts in Warlords of Draenor. I’m still seeing a lot of debate on forums about it, and it seems to me the people stating ‘I’m all for flying going away’ are the ones who follow it up with ‘anything that annoys other players is good’, or sentiments along those lines. That says it all to me really. I also assume the majority of these posters are into PvP, since unfortunately that mindset seems to go with it snugly in certain players. I do see a few genuine posters talking about their preferred way to play is as a ground-bound pioneer, which is fair enough, but as has been said many times, it’s a player’s choice (at the moment) whether to fly or not. It’s disappointing that people are regarded as ‘whiners’ when they talk about anything they’re unhappy with concerning the proposed game developments. An opinion isn’t necessarily a whine. But of course that’s just the way a lot of the berating forum posters operate – do unto others as you would never do unto yourself, and then have a fit if anyone does unto you in the same way.

My gut feeling is that Blizzard are going to wait and see how things go with WoD concerning when, if ever, to introduce flying into the expansion. Will the players quieten down and just accept they won’t be able to get about quickly and easily, or will they continue to complain about it? Difficult to predict. I do wonder what the real reason is behind Blizzard’s decision over it. Part of me can’t help feeling the ‘flying destroys immersion in the game’ excuse is not the entire truth. It simply doesn’t rest easy with the lucrative store mounts, including very recent ones, being flyers, and all the other reasons I stated in my last post about it. What *is* the real reason and why aren’t we told? Still, really no point speculating any more – we’ll have to wait and see.

I think it’s peculiar we’ve not had any news about a Beta for WoD, never mind a definite release date, other than the vague ‘Fall’ that’s mentioned when you preorder the expansion. You just can’t help feeling something’s amiss, since most people expected a Beta to appear a couple of months at most after Blizzcon last year, with a late spring/early summer release to follow it. Silence is the worst thing, and the only times it’s been broken recently is to let out snippets of news that has unnerved the players. I really wish Blizzard had backed up these snippets with something like ‘We know some of these changes might sound startling, but don’t worry about them, because we’re aware of your concerns, know what we’re doing, and it’s far from our intention to cause upset.’ Even that would have been better than the lack of any reassurance at all.

It’s interesting, and worthy of an entire post on its own, how people take so seriously changes to the world of Warcraft. I’ve thought about it a lot, because I too sometimes have what can only be described as emotional reactions to changes in what is only a game… or is it? After pondering it, I came to the conclusion that for many players, perhaps even the majority, WoW is as valid an environment as that of the real world, because they spend a lot of their leisure time in there. Decisions made in that world affect their enjoyment of and participation in the game. If Azeroth is regarded as a valid yet virtual world, then the Blizzard team is her government, and decisions made by politicians, whether in virtuality or reality, affect their subjects. The Blizzard team comprises a feudal government, since we didn’t elect them. Their chancellors demand tithes – the monthly sub – and in return we are allowed to live on land we do not own. It belongs to the government. This body controls the world and although the subjects might have a say concerning potential changes, they know their voices can be ignored if the government chooses to do so. Mostly the governors are benevolent, because happy subjects are more likely to continue living in that world and paying the tithes, rather than packing their bags and seeking a different world. But ultimately the government has the final say on everything, and like in reality it might impose changes the population just has to accept and live with. You could explore this idea in far more depth and length – I find it really intriguing to think about.

Still, on to cheerier things. I’m really enjoying Reaper of Souls, the new Diablo expansion. It’s come at a good time to keep members of our guild occupied while we wait for news or materialization of WoD. The other night there were more players on our Clan roster in Diablo than there were on our guild one in WoW. At least we’re still all playing together, rather than people splintering off to do other things because they’ve got little to do in WoW. The new Act in the game is beautifully designed, despite the ‘yuck’ moments of having to wade through streets full of corpses at some points. Well, this is Diablo; it’s always had a high ‘yuck’ factor here and there. Killing a huge burrowing worm with such force that all that’s left is a bloody spine on the floor has both sickening and comedy value, I suppose, as do the heads flying off and bouncing across the ground now and again. I really like all the improvements and additions made to the game, and applaud the decision to remove the Auction Houses. Now you can just go to get your own gear, and not be hampered by the greed of players putting good items on the AH at daftly inflated prices. Gear drops have improved to accommodate this, although you do come to a point where you find nothing useful is dropping any more and you’ll have to punch above your weight a bit and go for a much harder level of play in order to get things moving again – which of course is the whole idea of the game. Legendaries appear far more frequently, as do really good plans for excellent pieces of gear to craft.

The new Crusader character is fun to play, although I’ve spent most time when I’ve been in there working on my Witch Doctor. She was a bit so-so before but seems a far more rounded character now and much more enjoyable. I’m accruing Paragon levels on her swiftly. All the new activities added for end game are great too – random scenarios you can solo or do with friends – to collect loot and also special shards that enable you to open a Nephalem rift for even greater rewards. Some of the ‘bounty’ scenarios are very short so are ideal for people with limited time to play.

The transmogging and enchanting systems are also good additions – I wish WoW emulated them. Being able to ‘learn’ the appearances of bits of gear you pick up, and add them to your private store, so that you can transmog into them on all your characters is a cool idea. No need to store bits of gear in your Stash or on your character any more – and in every game of this type storage is always an issue, so anything to help with that is most welcome. The enchanting is far more specific than the reforging in WoW, allowing greater customization into more useful stats. All in all, I haven’t found anything I don’t like. If there is a downside, it’s that the world of Diablo is far smaller than what you find in an MMO, so there’s a danger of becoming bored of the same scenery over and over, but the new random scenarios have done a lot to counter that.

I know there’s always the argument that MMOs are supposed to be games where you group with people, and I wouldn’t disagree with that in terms of large group ventures like raids, but I do like the choice you have in Diablo, of being able to solo everything or play with friends if you want to. It doesn’t make our guild any less social, but just adds a refreshing amount of freedom.

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I’m not sure where the title of this post comes from – a film, a book, a tract, some dodgy political manifesto? It’s just familiar to me, and works for this particular post.

What I’m reading in the ethers this week has got me thinking. I’m reading more and more forum threads and blogs about the evaporation of the raiding pool on realms, and the shrinking amount of guilds. A veritable drought, it seems. Some posters provide statistics drawn from various sources that allegedly demonstrate that there are now fewer guilds raiding than there were at the pinnacle of it, which apparently was in Wrath.

I’m also reading a lot from maturing and mature players who say they now simply don’t have the time to commit to strict raiding schedules, and that LFR works better for them. It’s simple logistics.

I think what us veterans have to face and accept is that the game, nearly ten years old, is the not the animal we encountered when we first played. Whenever we fetched up on the shores of Azeroth, be it in Vanilla, TBC, Wrath or even Cata, it is not now the world we knew. Like the real world, it evolves and changes, and not always to our liking. Time moves faster in a virtual world. Generations can pass in relatively few years, well per expansion, probably. So it takes far less time for us to become grumpy old gits.

That said, we have to applaud the fact that this frontier world, perhaps even Brave New World, (who knows what might follow in our life times), not only survives but evolves. The players coming to it now don’t arrive with the baggage of memories and experiences that older players have. To them, it is fresh and new, and, as in real life, we can only envy the young for whom each new experience is a thing of wonder and discovery. Who can forget the first love?

The fact is we are at the vanguard of something wondrous, which is humanity venturing into the New Frontier of virtuality. It’s primitive in comparison to what science fiction writers might dream about, but it is, without doubt, the start. Azeroth lives, in its own way. It has community, an economy, and even a feudal government in the form of its developer, Blizzard. This entity might also be regarded as the prevailing deity of Azeroth, since its whims dictate how the world rises and falls, and the fate of its inhabitants. Plenty for Pop Culture magicians to work with there – and believe me they already have.

All of these concepts are extremely interesting, not only to creative writers like myself, but also to academics in the realms of many observant and scientific disciplines. What we have in Azeroth is a model to study; humanity’s first steps beyond the material world. But that said, evolution can be painful, especially when it’s experienced in such an accelerated form as we find in Azeroth and its ilk.

I’ve written here before of my concerns about the activities within WoW that for nearly a decade have kept people playing. The end game content was The Grail that few players could reach. It was the Mystery, the Heart of the Rose, whatever mystical tag you want to give it. But as time has passed, the mysteries of the game have slowly blossomed, become available to more than the privileged few, and that unfolding was both exciting and curious. Now the rose is open wide, and perhaps, some might say, tending to discard its dying petals. There is no mystery now. All is revealed. But some people prefer this carpet of bruised petals. The rose is not going to rot more than this, simply lie there, open, dismembered, to be trodden upon, its fragrance released by whoever treads upon the fallen petals.

You old ‘uns know what I’m talking about. You know we might be facing the demise of the game as we knew it, the community (warts and all) as we knew it. Even guilds as we knew them might not be the same in the future. Much as I might grumble about some of the changes, I also think the Great God Blizzard has to be brave here and continue to expand frontiers. The veterans of WoW can be regarded as its priesthood, and to them alone were once revealed the secrets of the gods. Now, the common people are given access to what was once the divine. The priesthood are appalled. Obviously. But they cannot fight progress.

So, how do we carry on, us veterans? Simple. Accept what is. We do, after all, have the choice to leave this virtual world, or we can continue with it to see where it heads. Pointless to complain, really. For me, I’m still fascinated by the discoveries, because I don’t just spend time in Azeroth to be a gamer. I’m also a writer and a practitioner of magic. What I see there is of interest to those sides of my being too.

Let’s, just for a moment, imagine the petals of our Heart of the Rose are fractals, a dizzy, unending kaleidoscope of possibilities. Some people might subscribe to WoW simply to play a game, perhaps mostly oblivious of the world of it around them. To others, the world itself is mostly the point, the intrigue, the pull. The petals might have fallen, but within each of them are countless other worlds, other possibilities, the future. I’m along for the ride. Are you?