Category: Quests


While WoW is the game I play the most, I also dabble in Rift – less so since WoD as I’m kept busy in WoW with what game time I have. I’ve kept visiting Telara, the world of Rift, over the past six months; tinkering about because I do love the atmosphere of that world. Nightmare Tide, Rift’s latest xpac, came out a short while before WoD, so I played it pretty relentlessly during the weeks I was waiting for WoW’s new xpac to hit, knowing I wouldn’t be spending as much time in Telara thereafter. I didn’t manage to get a character to level cap in that time, but recently – having levelled nearly all of my 20 Nordrassil WoW characters to 100, and a bit quested out with Draenor – thought I’d grind out the last two levels on my main in Rift with the benefit of some hefty experience potions.

One thing that struck me when I went back to Rift to level was that I didn’t feel as immersed in the game world as I do in WoW. I think this is partly down to the nature of the Nightmare Tide xpac – we were carted off to the dimension of Water to help out with various calamities, but our faction leaders and familiar figures from Telara didn’t come to fight alongside us or appear constantly as such figures do in WoD. Consequently, you feel sort of isolated from the main world. In WoW, we have a lot of well known figures from Azeroth making the journey with us to Draenor – some of them lose their lives for it – but as a Defiant player in Rift, I missed those old faces, such as Asha Catari and The Faceless Man. It didn’t feel like the faction was doing anything *together*. The new races in the Plane of Water don’t appeal to me that much. The mermaids are cool, and so is the strange aquatic beast, Fenric, who isn’t quite what they appear, (that character is probably the best), but there isn’t much characterisation otherwise. Fenric is the only NPC who travels with you throughout the story, changing and growing themselves, much as Yrel does in WoD. But Fenric is a one off. The ruling class in Draumheim, the major city hub, are all bonkers, living in hallucinations and delirium, and their madness started getting on my nerves rather than amusing me. I didn’t warm to any of them. The baddies are just out and out baddies, generic RPG almost, spouting clichéd lines and lacking the nuances of the Draenor warlords, with their distinct characters.

I also missed the levelling experience of WoD. We take so much for granted in WoW. Rift sometimes seems like the retirement home of all the disaffected WoW players who complained WoW was too easy. Levelling in Rift isn’t. Yes, you can pick your way around carefully and not get into too much trouble, but much of it seems geared towards group play – even during questing. You can’t just plough in and take on multiple mobs and expect to emerge unscathed. With questing gear alone it takes a while to kill things and while mobs aren’t as sensitive as they were in earlier days of Rift, they still get annoyed with you at a fair distance. You often have to search for quest objectives that might be in difficult to reach places; constant lengthy fights with irrelevant mobs gets tiresome after a while. Even without flying (and regular readers of this blog will know my feelings on that!), levelling in WoD was – and is – fluid and satisfying. You don’t get stuck in bottlenecks of difficulty where you can’t progress alone. In a game of this type, I think that’s the way levelling should be, an interesting, colourful journey – save the hard stuff for level cap.

So, going back to Rift has made me appreciate WoW more. I realised how much of WoD I like. One thing I’m utterly satisfied with is the garrisons and I’ll be disappointed if we don’t get something similar in the next xpac. But I can’t help thinking that due to the fact a lot of players seem to dislike garrisons, Blizzard might possibly jettison them, rather than tweak them carefully to iron out their weaknesses. Such is Blizzard’s usual response – go to extremes. For me, garrisons have enabled my army of alts to have purpose again. The follower missions are great for getting them gear, so it’s possible to raid with them, with premade groups, not just LFR. My warlock and mage are both around the 660 ilevel mark, with others not far behind. I like the fact that if I haven’t got time to go out farming for mats, (without flying, a vile chore), I can just send the alts round their mines and herb gardens for a while, gathering enough to support those who need mats for their professions. The only farming I tend to put off, even when it’s needed, is trapping beasts for my barns – one each on Horde and Alliance. That’s a chore, because we have to taxi to Nagrand for it, and with some classes those elite wolves must be pretty annoying, as they pack a punch. I have Hunters for both barns, which makes the job easy enough, but even so, lengthy. It’s fine for passing the time when I’m in a queue for group content, but that’s about it.

Prior to WoD, I’ve always had my two mains, a Druid healer and a Hunter, who’ve stepped in to work as our raid team required them. I’ve had a couple of tanks, who are not needed at the moment, so would, but for WoD, be languishing doing nothing. My next two characters – semi main – were the warlock and the mage, but often they didn’t get much to do, if anything. Now, with the boost of follower missions, it’s possible to have multiple characters capable of end game. I can pick and choose which ones I’ll do LFR with each week – there’s no rush after all . These occasional visits help augment their gear. If there’s ever a situation where we need one of these classes present in our raid team, I have a fairly decent character waiting in the wings, who can be brought up to scratch without too much effort. With my mains, at present I’m healing in our guild raid team exclusively, but have kept my Hunter pretty much on par, should I need to swap to him at any point. I adore this flexibility, which we’ve never had to this extent before. Other guild members have also got a couple or more characters at a decent level, which helps with team formation when members fluctuate. Blizzard have got this aspect just right. Small and medium sized guilds need this flexibility, and the ability to gear up a character to an acceptable level pretty quickly in a personnel emergency is great.

Going back to garrisons, another thing I love about them is the followers themselves. If you bother to ask one to help when you’re defending a garrison invasion, some of them have cool animations and spell effects, as well as great-looking armour and weapons. A friend of mine had the gnome warlock Ranni Flagdabble along the other night when I went to help him with a garrison invasion, and this little gnome spontaneously erupted into a huge demon form to fight. I also particularly like the priest Rorin Rivershade, and her gorgeous armour has tempted me to brave pvp so I can farm honor points for a similar set for my own priest. (There are a lot of older pvp armour sets on sale for honor at the pvp vendors on Serpent Spine wall in Pandaria, many of which are stunning.)

In a way, Rift has player housing with the dimensions, but those buildings you create, and the landscapes you can transform, are empty. There are no NPCs, so they’re like ghost towns, as if everyone has just left. Rift players who are into dimensions plead for some life in the form of critters and humanoid NPCs, but Trion don’t seem keen to devote time and resources to granting that wish. In WoW, we have life in abundance in our garrisons. When all your followers are at home, the garrisons are busy and full of residents. Nor are they just static – they appear to be getting on with their lives, talking to one another, wandering about, going for a drink in the inn… Rift dimension addicts would kill for that!

I’ll really miss my followers when we leave Draenor. They’ve become as familiar as my actual characters and I enjoy seeing them mooching about the garrison. I came across two having a row the other day, and one of them burst into tears as I passed by. I wondered what they were arguing about! I like the way Blizzard has made an effort to give these 100s of NPCs their own little character traits. I don’t want to leave mine behind, and would happily take all of them with me into whatever adventures we have next. I wouldn’t mind levelling them up again, in the same way my characters will have to level, perhaps swapping in some new team members now and again, if someone interesting pops up in the inn. But I’m more or less resigned to the fact they’ll remain in Draenor. I can see myself going back to visit them, once they no longer have to work by going out on missions and are always around the garrison.

Another thing I think Blizzard has done really well is the changes to the subsidiary professions. While the crafting professions have become a bit tiresome, Cooking, First Aid and Fishing are now easy to level. It’s possible to get all your alts to top Fishing without too much effort. That has never happened before, mainly because Fishing was such a grind and so time-consuming. Now, it’s a great thing to do (along with barn stocking) when you’re queued for a dungeon or LFR. Passes the time and is very productive (even more so when you have Nat Pagle ensconced in the Fishing Shack). The more proficient fishermen and women can provide the fish for the daily quest for alts, which awards a whopping 15 points, so you can steadily advance everyone’s Fishing level without having to pay too much attention to it. You need *something* to do while you’re queuing, after all. Cooking and First Aid are also mainly levelled by fish, so Fishing helps max them quickly too. I’m still surprised that it’s most likely all of my alts will have top Fishing by the end of the xpac. That’s unheard of! I still think Archaeology needs some work (shudder), and in the next xpac I hope Blizzard makes changes again to the crafting professions, but they shouldn’t touch the subsidiary profs now – they’re perfect as they are.

One thing that most players seem to agree on is that the levelling aspect of WoD is really good. It’s polished – no other word for it – and I really can’t see it can be improved upon. There are shaky areas in the game, which I’ve talked about on this blog, as have many others on their own blogs and on forums, but really when you look at the competition, WoW still deserves its crown. I’m fond of Telara and my characters in Rift, but if you think crafting profs are now grindy in WoW, go there for a bit. It costs a fortune to level them and they’re really fiddly. All of them. There’s no fast track method to gear up alts, even if crafting materials are easily acquired through minion missions. But those minions are just pictures on a mission Window, they’re not there with you inworld.

I’m not sure Blizzard will ever be able to perfect such aspects of the game as raiding, dailies, class changes, and pvp, since players have so many different requirements, and what pleases one lot of players greatly disgruntles many others. But the aspects that are constant Blizzard generally does well. Crafting, hmm, still needs attention – finding that balance between commitment and result without making it too fast or too slow. As for the story, whether you like the way it’s done or not, there *is* a story, a history, and people within it. It’s not just tacked on as an afterthought.

People tend to look back on earlier days of WoW as some kind of Golden Age, but the improvements to the game and quality of life changes have lifted it miles above its formative years. We just tend to forget all the bad stuff and concentrate fondly on what is perceived as good. I think it’s time we reflected on just what’s so good about WoW *now*. I can remember thinking I’d never get to see places like Black Temple and Serpentshrine Cavern, but now every raid is available to all – at different levels of difficulty. I can remember thinking I’d never be able to afford the faster ground mount in Vanilla. It took me months to grind the gold for the slowest mount. Now, gold comes easily and there is an abundance of mounts – account wide. I won’t go further with the comparisons because it’s old news, but it’s also good to remind ourselves of the changes. WoW is never going to be the perfect game we’d all like, because there are millions of visions of that perfect game. But despite its shortcomings, there’s no doubt: it’s a damn *good* game.

Coda: as Blizzard are renowned for their spectacular pendulum swings, are we looking forward to an xpac that’s flying only? 😉

Advertisements

There is much debate going on at the moment about the fact that once you’ve got your main character through to 90 in Mists, it’s rather a pain for your subsequent alts to have to ride on the ground through all the zones. Flying is not allowed until 90 and many think that for alts it should be allowed, via Heirloom Tomes for example. While I see both sides of this argument, there are some pros and cons to consider.

 Ground Mounts are Just a Pain When Levelling on Alts

Yes, they are. There’s no doubt that a certain – rather large – level of pain is involved in fighting through tons of mobs to get to a quest objective, only for some other player to ninja it off you while you’re fighting. Sometimes, with no ninjas in sight, it’s just wearisome to fight in and fight out through a swarm of fast respawning mobs – all the time. I get that. And I hate it myself. Being able to swoop in on a flying mount directly to where you need to be and who you need to kill is fabulous.

But there is something to be said for experiencing this really beautifully-designed expansion from the ground. I think a lot of players rushed their mains to 90, almost blindly. To be frank, I did so too really. The first alt they level is the one who will have the time to investigate and explore the new continent. This is obviously more interesting and realistic from the ground. For this reason, I think flying at lower level should be held off for a patch or two. It didn’t hurt in Northrend. I levelled several alts the hard way back in Wrath. Although I must admit that the first alt I levelled with Heirloom flying – my rogue – was like a silky dream. No more fighting through annoying mobs to get to a quest objective. No more fretting that some other ‘considerate’ player would pinch my quest item as I was fighting a path through to it. It was blissful. But that said, I’d be happy to wait for that in Mists. While I’m an impatient player, I could bear waiting a couple of patches before we get Eze-mode for alts. The land is more realistic from the ground, and it’s beautiful to quest through.

Ok, some players really hate questing. It’s not their objective for the game; they just want to get to top level, gear up, and raid. Any impediment to that is just going to annoy those people. They did it all on their main character, no doubt cursing all the way through, so why shouldn’t they be given leeway on their alts? Why be forced to do it all again and again the hard way. I understand this complaint.

The solution, I think, is to allow flying at earlier levels like they did in Northrend, but not immediately, and everyone’s first character should experience the content to 90 without flying. Just enjoy it. Trust me, it’s fun, if you forget the stress of gearing up and raiding. I personally would be very happy if two patches down the line, an Heirloom flying tome came in. But in the meantime, I’ll also be happy to level my alts slowly and look around.

This expansion is going to be with us for two years. Forget what they say about expansions being released quicker; we know this won’t happen. We have plenty of time.

 PvP Concerns

For some reason, some people want to play on PvP realms and then weep over the consequences. Sorry guys, but why? One concern that’s been voiced is that level 90 players being able to fly inflicts hideous ganking harm on those who can’t fly, so everyone should be able to. I can’t really sympathise with this. If it bothers you, why the hell are you on a PvP realm? Why would anyone want to level on a PvP realm, without being accepting of ganking and all that shenanigans? The idea, frankly, is just ridiculous. It’s amazing how many people are upset about what happens to them on these realms. What do they expect? PvP worldwide is just license to be a dick. And every dick on the realm will happily take advantage of that. Change to a PvE realm, guys, and just enjoy playing WoW without all that stupidity and exposure to the worst element of players. Leave PvP realms to the dicks who enjoy inconveniencing each other for the hell of it. Unless you’re one of them.

Faster Ground Mounts

This is a great idea I’ve read about, but sorry guys, the fact that WoW is both PvE and PvP means you’ll never get it. PvP spoils a lot of PvE play again and again. It’s hugely annoying for PvE players. Yes, having ground mounts go at 150% or 200% would be great, and probably a lot would happily pay for that to help with PvE levelling and get it over quicker, but it will never happen, because of the implications – apparently – in PvP battlegrounds. This is what I’ve read so can only assume it to be true. There’s enough previous form to suggest it’s right. I’ve seen the class of my main character – a Hunter – be butchered time and time again because of PvP concerns, which just emasculates him in PvE. I’m going to see it again imminently with the nerf to Lynx Rush, for no other reason than PvP players whining about Hunters being overpowered. It’s not like Lynx Rush puts Hunters way at the top of DPS meters in PvE. It’s just a great skill I’ll be sorry to see so diminished for burst damage, which is helpful in raids, never mind on all those sodding dailies I have to do, when I sometimes get swamped with fast respawning mobs. I wish PvE and PvP would separate forever, be different games. It won’t happen. So we just have to suck it up – continually. Some classes more than others. It seems unfair to me that Blizzard always listens to the PvP players and nerfs classes because of their moaning. It doesn’t happen the other way around. At one time, during Wrath, I had to stop playing my Hunter completely in raids because of what PvP adjustments had done to his DPS. I’m not bitter… noooo. But anyway, *cough*, where was I? Oh yes, faster ground mounts will never be.

Conclusion

I think we will see alts being able to fly earlier eventually. It will be like in Northrend, and it will come at the right time. Flying isn’t always the answer to everything as players doing all the level 90 dailies will be able to attest. Other ‘considerate’ players will still ruin your day whether you can fly or not. So with that in mind, levelling to 90 without flying isn’t really that much of a bind.

That said, questing through Townlong Steppes and Dread Wastes without flying is really quite horrible. It seems to me those zones were designed for players who could fly, because of the amount of mobs and their fast respawn rates. My recommendation is to do every zone before that with your alts so you get to 90 before those last two zones. It is far more pleasant, even if it does take a bit longer. And with alts, there is surely no rush to get there.

I’ve already had it ‘up to here’ with dailies in Mists. It started off fairly benignly, as if soft-footed maidens wafted over to me in Shrine of the Seven Stars and whispered to me about farms and cloud serpents. To be fair, Tillers and Order of the Cloud Serpent were fine. I didn’t suffer any undue pain (other than that hideous monkey cave for the Cloudies, but we won’t mention that). But then… Golden Lotus. The name itself conjures images of serenity, balmy sunlight and peace. Surely these dailies will be nothing more than setting forth upon a gilded barge upon a gilded lake, trailing my hand in the water to catch the enchanted fish that leap eagerly to my touch.

Not Quite.

Other players are involved. While the dailies themselves, unto themselves, are not that bad (most anyway), it’s as usual other people who turn the whole experience into a disaster. There are just too many of them. I really don’t mind actually doing the dailies, and I accept they are optional. You don’t even need revered with every faction in order to raid. The game has been designed so you can start raiding without; a couple of those faction pieces just help a bit. The daily quest option is clearly also for people who can’t stand raiding, so they get a chance for nice gear as well. That’s utterly commendable. But that said, I do think Blizzard hasn’t got it right with the mechanics of the dailies. As I’ve said before, too few mobs, too few drops, plus too many players = meltdown. Would it really hurt for every Mushan in Dread Wastes to have a tongue, for example? Today, I slaughtered dozens of the things, thigh deep in a veritable abattoir of Mushan corpses, in order to get my four. Dozens of other players were trying as well. Seriously, it could have been a skinner’s paradise, only some players have got so jaded and mean with the whole experience, they refuse to loot, so the corpses are unskinnable. While the bison of Pandaria were left to rot in the rain, players were hovering red-eyed seeking a spawn to kill. Spot one and everyone homed in. Fabulous. One tongue per kill would be good, or even one tongue per three kills. Please Blizzard. It’s not that hard, surely, and will it really alter the game that much, other than making players less angry?

Then you have quests where it’s necessary to fight some mobs in order to get to your objective, which is handy for another player who can nip in and steal what you need while you’re fighting. That’s not great, is it? There are several quests like this.

I appreciate that the introduction of these dailies makes the factions relevant and pertinent to the game, and everyone will know who they are. I personally don’t think that rep should just be gained by wearing a tabard in a dungeon, but for the sake of the August Celestials, is it really necessary to punish players unnecessarily while doing dailies by making them needlessly frustrating and time-consuming? Many have limited time to play. I can spend hours a night (if I so opted) doing the dailies for all the factions, not because the quests are hard, but simply because of the sheer amount of other people trying to doing them too. I can’t remember Molten Front at its most frenetic being this frustrating. I have opted, more sensibly, to work on one of the busy factions at a time. That includes Golden Lotus, Klaxxi and Shado Pan. Inexplicably, the August Celestial dailies are utterly benign, sharable by whoever’s there and over in minutes. So anyone can do those and have plenty of time for more. I assume this is because we’re supposed to regard the AC as well, august and celestial – thanks for the painless dailies, your honours, we appreciate it!

Don’t get me wrong, this isn’t a moan about the existence of the new dailies. I actually think they’re a great idea. What isn’t a great idea is herding massive amounts of people together into a small space and making them fight over very limited resources.  Despite the hostility this engenders, it just wastes everyone’s time. What these dailies must be like on a PvP realm I just cannot imagine. No, I really don’t want to imagine…. Blizzard, please let people get their four Mushan tongues with a reasonable amount of kills, so there are fewer players after them at a time. Let all the quests be like that. I really can’t understand why this wasn’t implemented from the start. Unless, of course, it’s deliberate that a player should spend two and a half hours on one set of dailies (me, the other evening on Klaxxi). Well, that definitely is one way to make the content last longer, isn’t it? Whether people will remain to stomach it is another matter.

What with all the things I’ve had to do in WoW, and real life work I’ve had to do, I’ve not had time to write about the new expansion. Remiss! So here it is.

Mists of Pandaria has lived up to my expectations and more. It is a far more polished expansion than Cataclysm was, with a ton of activities for top level. There are one or two things I’m not so happy about, but much of that might be down to personal likes and dislikes. I don’t expect any MMO to be absolutely perfect, tailored to my desires alone.

I was somewhat astonished that some players somehow zoomed to level 90 in a day and then started to complain they were bored. For those of us who raid, there was some incentive in getting our main characters to top level fairly quickly, simply because once they’re 90 we need to gear them up for raids. But in our guild, most of the team only started hitting 90 around 2nd Oct, and the remainder and other guildies continue to do so on a daily basis. Many people just wanted to take things easy and progress slowly through the zones, experiencing everything to the full. I and a few others got our main characters to 90 over the first weekend, but then I’d given myself a week off work to do this. After I’d hit the top level, I spent the rest of that weekend looking at all the things to do. I devoted a couple of hours to doing the Lorewalkers achievements to get to exalted with them and therefore able to purchase the Red Cloud flying disc mount. I started on Tillers rep to be able to cook decent buff food, and worked on my new farm for eventual self-sufficiency. I also started Order of the Cloud Serpent rep with an aim to secure myself a beautiful Cloud Serpent mount, but am not too stressed about any of these rather relaxing rep grinds. I’ll take them as they come and just enjoy the new content. There are quite a lot of reps to work on. I will talk about the Golden Lotus rep grind later; that is a different matter.

I really loved levelling, even though it was over fairly quickly. But this was my choice, simply because I wanted to start getting my main character raid ready as soon as possible. That said, most of the process was fantastic. The landscape is gorgeous, the majority of quests are interesting and fun to do, and I had a lot of fun exploring. I’ve enjoyed the dungeons I’ve done so far, normal and heroic. They are easier than Cataclysm dungeons certainly, but there is a fun factor that was missing in the Cataclysm instances. Mists ones are more enjoyable to do, with quirky little mechanics here and there. The ‘normal’ modes are levelling dungeons. That means they are able to be tackled by players of all levels of skill without too much trouble as they rise from 85 to 90. They are not supposed to be cutting edge, hard content. Neither are the heroic versions that come at 90. There is a new aspect of dungeons in the Challenge Modes. These are for people who like their instances punishing and taxing. So in my opinion there is absolutely no reason for such types to moan about the lesser difficulties being available for other people.

A few in the guild have had one quick bash at doing a Challenge Mode dungeon so far, but we are not quite well geared enough for that activity yet. We were slightly below the iLevel of 463 recommended for them. If anyone’s gear goes above that level, it is brought down if they enter a Challenge Mode dungeon. They are designed to stay difficult and people won’t be able to outgear them. Still, despite not being ready for the Challenge yet, what we managed was great fun and, as was announced before launch, much more like the old-fashioned Burning Crusade heroic level of difficulty. I can see that it will be of benefit for the same teams to work on them, devising the quickest routes and pulls, and how best to work together for success. I expect there are already comprehensive walk-through guides on the internet, but we didn’t look for them before we went. We decided just to have a look and see what a Challenge Mode will be like. We really enjoyed it, even though were unable to complete the challenge on a first try.

I can’t say I was overjoyed on the journey to 90 for being on the ground, i.e. having to use ground mounts not flying mounts. It was a great relief to be able to fly again at top level. This is because I’m not the most patient of people and it began to get on my nerves having to fight my way through a load of mobs to get to an objective and then back again because they’d all respawned in my path. It’s just a personal thing; I prefer to fly over irritating mobs that often only drop useless loot like a couple of fangs. Another downside was player over-crowding, but you have to expect that at the beginning of an expansion. Player behaviour wasn’t as bad as I saw it at the beginning of Cataclysm but that might be because Horde and Alliance were separated at the beginning, so less PvP shenanigans, and Blizzard seems to have learned from the past and implemented some player-friendly systems from the start. Remember how eventually named mob kills for dailies in Tol Barad completed for anyone who managed to get a hit in on them? Most named mobs/mini bosses needed for quests in Mists are the same. That is a wonderful improvement.  Mobs and quest items are usually plentiful enough – although there are unaccountably some quests/areas where this is not the case – so there is less griefing and selfish behaviour.  There is still *some*, but that’s inevitable in an MMO. I did find myself getting progressively angrier as I neared 90 simply because of the competition with other players who, to be fair to them, were probably equally as eager to get that last level as I was. People were more cut throat and selfish in the last two zones.  But before that, it was all pretty blissful. I’m going back to finish a couple of zones now for the Pandaria Loremaster achievement, and they do seem less fraught and busy than they were in the first week of playing in them.

The atmosphere of Pandaria is equal to Northrend, if not superior. I adored the Wrath of the Lich King expansion, simply because I felt immersed in that world, became part of it. Mists is the same. We can look upon Cataclysm as a hiccup, perhaps a needed one to belch up some wind, as it were, because the old world *did* need that massive overhaul. There was a lot I enjoyed about Cata, but for the first time ever in my history of playing WoW since Vanilla, I got bored and ran out of things to do. This is with a host of alts as well. With Mists I want to take things easy with the alts, so that never happens again. Looking at the expansion from where I stand now I’m fairly confident it will last two years as Burning Crusade and Wrath did – if we don’t rush through everything with all our alts. I confess to a slight prickle of urgency over professions on some of my alts, since I like to be self-sufficient in terms of enchantments and gems, but as we’re not raiding yet, and a couple of other guildies have maxed out on these professions, I will accept their generosity. It’s a part of my nature that I
like to do things myself, or at least be able to offer things in return to people, but my main is a Leatherworker, so I will at least have leg armor to hand out and can make a couple of half decent cloaks for the newly-dinged 90s. Plus there is the inevitable PvP leather-working gear that will help guildies flesh out a sagging iLevel to be able to get into heroic dungeons.

Now to what I don’t like. There isn’t much, but what there is, is annoying. As I said above unaccountably some quests are far more difficult than others simply because there are no mobs around. One or two players might come along and decimate the desired creature, then the mobs don’t reappear for ages, or else there are too few of them to start with. Same goes for a couple of quest items. Most quest objectives are quite the opposite, in that there are often too many mobs for a comfortable experience, (which is how they tend to be tuned at the beginning of an expansion, to accommodate player load), so it’s strange some are utterly different. Also, on a few of these quests, which are for dropped items, the drop rate is appalling, so you have a) few or no mobs around, b) a lot of player competition, and c) a dreadful drop rate. This has resulted in me spending half an hour in one case completing what should have been a quick and easy quest. If it was just the odd one or two like this, it wouldn’t be so bad, but I’ve been held up on several occasions, which is just frustrating for everyone there and incites bad feeling among the players trying to complete their objectives. We have enough grrs between players in WoW as it is, so Blizzard, please fix these quests.

The next thing that I have issues with is certain aspects of the reputation grind. I don’t mind working for things, and seeing steady progress. It’s always great when you hit the longed-for exalted and can then get whatever reward it is from that faction for getting there, and I was delighted to get my cloud serpent mount tonight after working on the rep to acquire it. Blizzard has done a lot to make the grinds less tedious, with a lot of variety among the quests so you don’t get the same ones every day. On the whole I’m enjoying The Cloud Serpents, Tillers and Anglers dailies. Klaxxi aren’t too bad either. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said of the Golden Lotus dailies. You need to get to revered with this faction to open up two other important factions, The August Celestials and The Shado-Pan. All of these supply gear that will help enormously with the start of Pandarian raiding, if not be essential.

The Golden Lotus dailies remind me greatly of the Tol Barad ones when they first became available in Cataclysm. The mobs hits like trucks, there are thousands of them constantly respawning and they take a long time to kill with average gear. There is also a baying mob of players at the quest locations at peak times, adding to the chaos and difficulty. With some of the dailies you really want others around to help keep the mobs off your back, while some quests make other players massive impediments to your own success, such as when you need to collect a particular item, or the quests where the mobs seem slow to respawn (not many in this case).  There are quite a few quests needing drops from mobs, and again the drop rate often isn’t good. For packed daily quest hubs, with so many players competing, this just seems like needless torment. The drops should be 100% guaranteed, or if that is really so dreadful a thought to contemplate for the developers, at least a 33% drop rate. There would be more mobs to go round, and players would finish their quests quicker leaving room for others to do theirs. As it stands, tempers fray and behaviour isn’t always exemplary. Out of sheer frustration perhaps, other players will steal your kills or your quest items as you’re fighting towards them. That’s not an uncommon situation with dailies, of course. But to add insult to injury, the amount of rep given for each of these annoying quests is 110 reputation.  On average, although I haven’t totted it up exactly, you get between 1000-1500 rep a day, once you get a few more dailies to do at Honored. You can imagine how long it’s going to take to get to revered, never mind exalted if you want the rewards that come from that. It’s 42,000 rep points to get from neutral to exalted. And many people can’t do daily quests every day.

I know from experience that daily quests that seem difficult in starter dungeon gear at the beginning of an expansion become a lot more forgiving when your character has been kitted out better. So despite the frustration I feel at times, I’m aware things will improve as I work through the different factions. But the sheer length of time it will take, given the paltry amount of rep you get, is more difficult to swallow. After an exhausting time clawing my way through the Golden Lotus dailies, I only see a hideously slow accumulation of rep points.  Luckily I’m doing them at the moment with a friend, and two people do have a much easier time of it than a solo player.

I’m aware Blizzard wants to make the content last, and if the Golden Lotus dailies were actually enjoyable I wouldn’t mind so much. But gritting my teeth to get through up to an hour of play I don’t even enjoy isn’t what I want to be feeling when I log on in an evening. You could have difficult mobs with good drop rates, or easier mobs with rarer drop rates, but for the gods’ sake, difficult mobs *and* bad drop rates is rather cruel. I don’t think the idea of ‘gating’ reputation factions is that good. Everyone is obliged to do the Golden Lotus quests if they want to progress to the other factions that might be more useful to them. And there is the risk that by the time they get to revered with the later factions, the gear they were striving for to help with raiding will already have been superseded by what they might have picked up in raids. Spreading the players out between all of the important rep factions would have been better I think; less crowding and hostility.

But aside from my grumbles about dailies and drop rates, I am loving the game at the moment. The pet battles are great fun, and hopelessly addictive, and there are a lot of sleek new mounts to collect that non-raiders will be delighted to know you can get from just playing the game and gaining reputation points with the various factions. There are tons of cool new mounts to get outside of raids. While I am a raider myself, I’ve never liked the way that raiders are given lots of stuff that others can’t get. I know the special snowflake types get their panties in a knot over ‘lesser players’ getting the same toys as them, but frankly I don’t care about it. I’ll ride a mount for as long as I care to, regardless of who else might, or might not, have it.

If I were to give Mists a mark out of ten, it’s 9 and a half. Only the level 90 rep grind has knocked off that half a point. I have a feeling that player comment will have some bearing on this and we will see beneficial nerfs to the grind, as we did in Tol Barad. But my minor gripes aside, I can recommend this addition to WoW whole-heartedly. I find it hard to tear myself away from Pandaria. Raiding will be coming soon for us, and then I’ll have more to say!