This has been in my mind a lot recently as, while MoP winds down, I’ve been spending a lot of time on alts on a realm different to where my mains live – these alts are all well below level 90.
I have thought at times, while struggling with farming leather, that the only thing that needs to be retained about crafting professions is ‘making things with stuff.’ The rest is certainly open to improvement.

The main problem is that crafting hasn’t changed a great deal since Classic WoW, which has resulted in crafting below level 60 being virtually useless, other than a means to level the profession. Lower level crafted pieces, unless particularly desirable for transmog, can’t be given away on the AH. You probably wouldn’t even shift them if you suggested *you* pay the customers to get them off your hands.

Once you leave Classic WoW and venture into the expansions, you find that the only decent crafted gear is for what was then top level, and can’t even be made in most cases until the professions are maxed. The only reason you’d bother to try and get some of those patterns and recipes – apart from being a completist – is if they’re for useful items like the various types of bags that can still be sold on the AH or used to equip alts. Inscription always remains relevant, (perhaps the only prof that does), but the recipes for all the others are useful only for the expansion they were created for.

Added to this is the inescapable fact that you no longer spend over a year in an expansion’s zones, but only a couple of weeks, which means that you far outlevel the areas, and are looking to move to new horizons, long before you’ve farmed enough materials for your professions to move on with you. I have a druid who is ready to go to Northrend – apart from the 500 (at least) knothide leathers she needs to make the items to get her out of Outland. I don’t want to be going back there to farm, and on that realm don’t have much spare gold, so can’t buy mats on the AH, so have no choice but to stay there killing things and skinning them. Her skinning, incidentally, is almost at the top level required for Northrend crafting, so no problem there. But from what I’ve experienced recently, only skinning seems to keep pace with leveling. Herbing and mining still have their problem areas.

I’ve seen so many good ideas from players, many of which I’ve thought of myself too, so can’t list everything here, but these are my main suggestions for crafting improvements.

1. A thorough overhaul that keeps professions relevant to level and zone, with better return from gathering professions, i.e. more herbs per node, more skins per beast, more ore per node, more cloth per drop.

2. Crafted items to be competitive with quest rewards, with blue items that require more effort being competitive with dungeon rewards. Do people bother making any of the epic items from the earlier expansions other than for transmog? I doubt it, so these should no longer require raid materials or recipe drops from raids to make. Add the recipes to a vendor once an expansion is superseded by the latest one. If it’s deemed right to keep in the various orbs or whatever to make the items, have these on the same vendor. I think it’s ok to make players pay, but in the majority of cases their time is more precious than their gold. Only the current expansion’s level of profs should require out of the way effort. Let people scratch their transmog itches with the earlier stuff!

3. Crafted items below the current expansion should not require outrageously difficult-to-get or rare mats, and the amount of mats required, (especially the dreaded leather), to be reduced per item. Get rid of the hides from Leatherworking – just make the items require leather or improved leather. The same goes for rare ores – it’s fine to have those in the recipe list, but not when it means you hit a leveling wall because of it, which you can’t get past easily until you have enough of them.

4. When a new expansion comes out, top level crafted items from previous expansions could be shuffled down the recipe list so that characters don’t have to be maxed in their professions to make them. These items, being fairly decent, would help characters without heirlooms level in the zones they’re questing in.

5. In addition, players could craft their own heirlooms, so that you don’t need currency to purchase them. This would add a further bit of point and interest to crafting profs.

6. Allow crafters to ‘disassemble’ items they make so that they can salvage materials from them – not the full amount that made them, obviously, but some. This would be a handy alternative to just vendoring them.

7. A wider selection of node levels within zones. On a herbalist, I hit the problem of transferring from one zone to another and finding that the herbs were predominantly too high level to pick. Yet the herbs in the zone I’d left behind were either no longer or rarely giving me leveling points. Coupled with the extra population from Cross Realm, this made herbalism annoying to level. I had to swap continents and venture into a zone far higher than my character was in order to farm herbs, so she could go back and pick them where she was actually questing, which was several levels lower. I’ve no doubt I’ll find similar when I level my Blacksmith and Engineer. Some thought needs to go into node quality distribution and their abundance throughout the zones.

8. Engineering needs a radical overhaul. The fiddliness of the mats now seems silly for the lower levels of the profession. Streamline it, and leave the headaches for the current expansion’s engineering requirements. Again, this is just a relic of the prof not having changed at low level since it was implemented. It’s woefully out of date.

9. Enchanting suffers from being pointless until top level. You don’t really need enchants to complete questing zones or indeed while doing dungeons to level. Enchanting scrolls less than current can’t be sold either. Perhaps more toys, pets and mounts could be introduced into the profession, such as in engineering, which even has a few of these at low level. New enchantments could be introduced that players *would* want, such as boosts similar to what you find on heirlooms – experience gains, enhanced loot drops, extended rest time, rep boosts and so on. Doesn’t have to offer massive increases, but enough to make players think they’re worth having. And when you replace a bit of gear you’ll want a new enchant for it, so this ensures demand.

It would also be an improvement if older enchanting materials could be upgraded in the same way you can currently combine dusts and essences of the same level. Or it might even be better to do away with all those different Classic materials and just have one dust type, one essence and one shard for 1-60.

10. Jewelcrafting could also do with a big overhaul, for the same reason Enchanting does. Gems are irrelevant for everything except current expansion content. They’re not needed to complete leveling content, and players won’t buy them because they get through gear so quickly while leveling. As gems will be going through a big change in WoD, it would clearly be a good time to reinvent the entire profession. I expect Blizzard already has ideas for this, but my thoughts are that items could be introduced such as necks and rings relevant to level throughout and made with easier to find mats. Pets, mounts and toys are always desirable to players, and perhaps BoE crafted temporary pets like totems that provide a buff or a heal. These ‘idols’ could look cool so that people would be more inclined to pop them out while questing or in dungeons. How about items similar to the one dropped by Kang in the Vale that turns you and your mounts into stone for a short while? I’m thinking of ‘costumes’ that make a player appear they’re made of diamond or rubies. In our guild, people are forever getting their toys out to change their appearance. They’re clearly very popular, so would make a good addition to professions.

I think I could go on forever listing improvements and ideas – the scope is limitless – so I’ll stop now before this list gets too long!

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